No defenses

New Mexico is home to 19 pueblos, 3 Apache tribes and a large swath of the Navajo Nation. How will they cope with the outbreak of COVID-19?

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Here, there and everywhere: Avoiding PFAS

The chemicals known collectively as PFAS are in everything from dental floss to outdoor gear. But consumers can make informed choices.

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Toxic timeline: A brief history of PFAS

Research in the 1940s and '50s led to the commercialization and widespread use of PFAS, substances that are now found in the bloodstream of almost all Americans.

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Till the cows come home

Contamination of the water supply for Highland Dairy in Clovis likely means the end of operations – and raises health concerns for area residents.

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Prescription for disaster: New Mexico’s lax oversight puts kids in danger

At least 44 states have introduced formal protocols or programs to boost oversight and monitoring of psychotropic drug use by children. Yet while other states work to limit psychiatric drugs, 30,000 NM children have prescriptions.

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Warrant: Psychiatrist over-medicated hundreds of children in his care

Albuquerque doctor is under investigation in 36 patient deaths.

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Years of frustration lie behind landmark school lawsuit

For Wilhelmina Yazzie, joining the groundbreaking lawsuit against New Mexico wasn’t an easy thing to do. It was the only thing to do.

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How the Yazzie lawsuit could be a ‘game-changer’

Behind the recent ruling in the New Mexico school funding lawsuit is nearly a decade of evidence that the state's public schools are not only failing children, but that children will be "irreparably harmed" if schools aren’t improved.

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Brain Drain: Graduates leaving New Mexico behind

No state can afford to lose high-quality, educated workers, the key ingredient for a thriving economy.

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Success by degrees

Adult education can be a path to generational change. But in New Mexico, where it is estimated that a third of the adult population could benefit, only about 3 percent are served.

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